Collections

The SA Maritime Museum preserves the oldest nautical collection in Australia. In 1872 the Port Adelaide Institute began a museum collection to complement its library and its educational and social programs. That collection grew over the following century reflecting the seafarers and the ships that visited Port Adelaide. It is now held in trust at the SA Maritime Museum.

The Maritime Museum’s collection ranges from the Port Adelaide Lighthouse that was first lit in 1869 to a plaque that explorer Matthew Flinders left at Memory Cove in 1802 to mark the loss to eight seafarers. It includes figureheads, nautical instruments, bathing costumes, shipwreck artefacts, paintings, models and vessels.

Our scope is the maritime heritage of South Australia from the coast to inland waters. The collection of over almost 20,000 objects and over 20,000 images is at once a window to the heritage of the local community and to the ships of the world..

Oronsay

Builder's full-hull presentation model of the passenger liner was created for the company. It was originally displayed in the Technological Museum at the South Australian School of Mines.

Twin screw steamer Oronsay was built in Glasgow in 1925 by John Brown and was the first Orient Line vessel to exceed 20,000 tons. Oronsay operated the UK to Australasia service sailing via the Suez Canal. After a stellar career in passenger transport, it was pressed into service as a troopship in World War II. Oronsay was torpedoed and sunk by submarine Archimede on 9 October 1942. 

 

Associated locations: Glasgow, Adelaide, Suez Canal, San Francisco, Suva, Honolulu, Vancouver, Panama Canal

Caption: Model , ORONSAY

AccessionNo: HT86672(m)

Material:

Physical Description:
From Robert Sexton's Models in SAMM: Stell twin-screw steamer, 20,043 tons gross, 633.6 x 75.2 x 33.0 ft, built Glasgow 1925 by John Brown, turbines. The builder's full-hull presentation model of the passenger liner built for the Orient Line, their first vessel to exceed 20,000 tons gross. This model was originally displayed in the Technological Museum at the SA School of Mines, and came to this collection via the SA Museum and Birdwood Mill.; Scale 1:48

Significance:
Elaborately detailed models like this were displayed in the booking offices of the Orient Line to impress potential passengers with the size and luxurious features of the vessel. Passengers could often select the location of their cabin by referring to the model.

Provenance:
From Robert Sexton's Models in SAMM: Stell twin-screw steamer, 20,043 tons gross, 633.6 x 75.2 x 33.0 ft, built Glasgow 1925 by John Brown, turbines. The builder's full-hull presentation model of the passenger liner built for the Orient Line, their first vessel to exceed 20,000 tons gross. This model was originally displayed in the Technological Museum at the SA School of Mines, and came to this collection via the SA Museum and Birdwood Mill. Scale 1:48