Collections

The SA Maritime Museum preserves the oldest nautical collection in Australia. In 1872 the Port Adelaide Institute began a museum collection to complement its library and its educational and social programs. That collection grew over the following century reflecting the seafarers and the ships that visited Port Adelaide. It is now held in trust at the SA Maritime Museum.

The Maritime Museum’s collection ranges from the Port Adelaide Lighthouse that was first lit in 1869 to a plaque that explorer Matthew Flinders left at Memory Cove in 1802 to mark the loss to eight seafarers. It includes figureheads, nautical instruments, bathing costumes, shipwreck artefacts, paintings, models and vessels.

Our scope is the maritime heritage of South Australia from the coast to inland waters. The collection of over almost 20,000 objects and over 20,000 images is at once a window to the heritage of the local community and to the ships of the world..

Ship model, Annie Watt

Waterline model of the ketch Annie Watt depicting it under sail. Annie Watt was one of the longest serving ketches in the South Australian fleet.

The original Annie Watt was a wooden ketch, 42 tons, built Port Esperance, Tasmania, in 1870 by John Wilson. It was the first vessel constructed by Wilson and was built to the order of George Watt of Hobart (after whose daughter it was named). Three years later Annie Watt was sold to South Australian interests. A workhorse of the coastal trade route, Annie Watt eventually became the last wooden ketch to trade in SA waters. Beached at the North Arm in the 1970s, the vessel was rescued by the SA Ketch Preservation Association and now belongs to the Museum. The model was made by local marine artist and model maker, John Tulloch. He served on board the Annie Watt for several years prior to 1917 and the model is based on his recollections of the vessel.

Creator: John Tulloch 

Associated Locations: Port Adelaide, Port Esperance, Tasmania 

 

Caption: Model , Annie Watt

AccessionNo: HT86314(m)

Depth: 930 mm

Width: 285 mm

Height: 740 mm

Material: Wood, cloth, plaster

Physical Description:
Simple rigged model of South Australian ketch Annie Watt. The hull is painted blue and the ketch's name embossed in white on the bow. Annie Watt is depicted under sail and floats on a blue sea crafted from plaster. A small white dinghy is attached to the stern.

Significance:
This ship model captures one of the oldest working ketches in South Australia Ketches were shallow draughted vessels specifically developed to navigate the State's shallow gulfs and to transport cargo between Port Adelaide. and the regional ports. They were a crucial transport link until the development of the road networks and railway. The Museum owns the original vessel. The model made by local Port Adelaide captain, John Tulloch, reflects sailors crafts and his personal connection to the vessel which he worked on prior to 1917. The museum holds an extensive collection of artworks and models made by John Tulloch

Provenance:
Annie Watt was a wooden centreboard ketch of 42 tons built in Port Esperance, Tasmania, in 1870 by John Wilson. The vessel was built to the order of George Watt of Hobart, after whose daughter it was named. Three years later was sold to South Australian interests. After a long career trading in local waters, Annie Watt was withdrawn from commercial use in 1970. It is now owned by the Museum. The model is a waterline model of the Annie Watt, depicting it under sail, made by Port Adelaide captain, marine artist and model maker, John Tulloch. He worked on the vessel for several years prior to 1917, and the model is based on his recollections of the ketch.